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Louisiana Native Plant Society (LNPS) recently put out a statement on habitat gardening and best practices for ecological resilience.  The Native Plant Initiative of GNO is aligned with this statement and supports property owners adherence to best practices of land and water conservation as crucial wildlife habitat.  You can read the entire position statement HERE.

LNPS also created a communication toolkit for Louisiana native plant gardeners to explain to their neighbors the benefits of habitat gardening and for finding common ground with neighbors who may not understand why a property owner would choose to garden this way. Click HERE to view the toolkit.

 

 

This event is open to the public and is intended to purpose to give the community an understanding of the massive water infrastructure project that will soon begin outside their doorsteps. Native plants will play a part in the stormwater management of this area. A bioswale will go in around Filmore Park, and Courtney was awarded a public art project for a footbridge over the bioswale. The footbridge is to be educational as well as artistic and will feature images and information about the native plants that will be in the bioswale and that grow in New Orleans. At this event, NPI will have an Activity and Information table where visitors and neighbors can learn about native plants, make SeedBeads with native seeds provided and/or take native seeds home to plant in their gardens.

This is an opportunity to share your knowledge about native plants and NPI. Courtney is open to any amount of help you can give. You might get a little dirty, so be prepared!

Tabling at Filmore Park, and seed scattering at meadow site.

9:30-11:30 - set up tabling at Filmore Park:  We will be introducing native plants to attendees. We'll have pictures of natives and of the plants that will go in the bioswale, NPI materials, etc., and need your expertise!  We will have bowls of native seeds, and will be set up for people to make seed balls, or to pot up seeds on the spot. Any pointers for what works best for tabling are welcome. More info on seed balls.

11:30 to 1:30 - tabling wrap up, reconvene at Native Wildflower Meadow at Leon C. Simon, assist in seed scattering (I have 2 lbs of a native mix) and tamping down seeds, breakdown. This will be the more active shift, scattering or assisting the scattering on site.

http://www.briarwoodnp.org/

Caroline Coroneos Dormon (1888-1971) by Amy Graham of Longue Vue Gardens

“I could no more have stopped studying birds, flowers, and trees and drawing them than I could have stopped breathing!”

 “Our swamp debutante (the iris) has become a horticultural queen, reigning in gardens around the world”, 1951

Considered Louisiana’s first conservationist and one of the most influential American naturalists of the early 20th century, Caroline Dormon was an accomplished horticulturist, botanist, archeologist, ornithologist, teacher, Louisiana Iris hybridizer and author.  As a child in Saline LA, Dormon developed a keen interest in nature and spent most of her life collecting, cataloging and preserving native plants.  As the first woman employed by the U.S. Forestry Service in 1921, Caroline worked to establish Kisatchie National Forest by writing an enabling act that would allow the government to purchase old growth forest land.

Affectionately known as “Miss Carrie”, Dormon’s expertise was uncontested which conveyed into years of lecturing and consultation work through the 1940’s. Projects included highway beautification with the Louisiana Department of Transportation, nature-scaping of the Huey P. Long Charity Hospital and the establishment of the Louisiana State Arboretum in 1961. She also developed forestry education materials for schools, promoted forestry conservation support among civic leaders, and advocated for education and support for the Choctaw and Chitimacha tribes of Louisiana.

Dormon’s letters attest to professional correspondence with notable national figures including Lady Bird Johnson, Thomas Edison, garden writer Elizabeth Lawrence, famed botanist Dr. J.K. Small and landscape architect Ellen Biddle Shipman.

Published works include: Wild Flowers of Louisiana (1934), the first published work devoted entirely to describing Louisiana wildflowers, Forest Trees of Louisiana (1941), Flowers Native to the Deep South (1958), Natives Preferred (1965), Southern Indian Boy (1967), and Bird Talk (1969).

Dormon’s lifelong project was her 121-acre home Briarwood.  On Dormon’s passing in 1971, her beloved Briarwood was willed to The Foundation for the Preservation of the Caroline Dormon Nature Preserve, Inc, and became the Briarwood Nature Preserve, now designated as a National Historic Place.

The Dormon archives are located at the library of Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, LA.

Awards and appointments:

Member of the DeSoto Commission

Eloise Paine Luquer Medal by the Garden Club of America

Louisiana’s Board of Public Welfare and the State’s Highway Department

Honorary Doctorate of Science from Louisiana State University for Distinguished Scientific Achievement

To read more about Caroline Dormon, click here.